Who Is the Hero In the Story?

CBS Sunday Morning does it again. They never cease to amaze me with what wonderful stories they produce. This last Sunday’s story, “A veteran’s car, and a son’s keepsake”, was no exception.  While many of you might have watched it, watch it again and ask yourself the question, “Who is the hero in the story?” https://www.cbsnews.com/videos/a-veterans-car-and-a-sons-keepsake/ 

I believe the hero in this story is typical of many heroes…quiet about the service they provide to others. As you watch this story, look for Kyle Fox. He didn’t have to do what he did. He even seems a bit shy about it. But like most heroes, he puts the emphasis of the story on other people, places, anything but himself. Check out his organization, Follow the Flag http://followtheflag.org and you’ll see what I mean.

So I ask you, “What have you done to be a hero in a story?” I will strive to be the kind of hero that Kyle Fox is.

Honoring a Hero Today, Col. Richard Cole

Today is Veterans Day, 2013. Not just any Veterans Day, but one that is especially meaningful. Last Saturday, at a ceremony at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, a final toast was made for the Doolittle Raiders. A bottle 1896 of cognac was ceremonially uncorked and a toast was made, delivered by Col. Richard Cole, a man I had the honor of interviewing in November 2012. He is one of only four surviving members of the original 80 member team of Doolittle Raiders. Here is a screen shot from the interview, part of a film Lee Kirgan produced for The Yellow Rose Project, a short film to celebrate the B-25 and to support The Yellow Rose. The 1944 B-25, the Yellow Rose, is hangared in San Marcos, Texas, and is maintained by the Centex Wing of the Commerative Air Force http://tinyurl.com/TheYellowRoseFilmProject.Col. Richard Cole 12:7:2012

For the story of the ceremony and a bit of the history of the Doolittle Raiders, click on this link: http://tinyurl.com/opyazj3. Many years ago, 80 goblets were made, on each one was carved a name of a member of the Doolittle Raiders. Every year at a reunion of the surviving Raiders, the goblet with the names of those who died in the previous year is ceremonially turned over, then a toast is made to those who died in the raid, those who have died since the raid, and to those still living. Today, there are only four goblets standing upright, representing the four Raiders still alive. Three were at the ceremony last Saturday evening.  

A bottle of 1896 (the year of Col. Doolittle’s birth) cognac that was given to Col. Doolittle was uncorked. Many years ago, the survivors of the Raid vowed not to open the bottle till most were gone. It was decided that this was the year to open it and give a final toast. Here is a video of the ceremony: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDKPYpkU5Cg. Fast forward to 48:53 to watch Col. Cole open the bottle and give the final toast.

On this Veterans Day, let us all remember all those who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom, as well as those who served and continue to serve our great country in order to preserve that freedom.

An Inspiring 9/11 Story You Haven’t Heard

I just found a link to an inspiring 9/11 story I hadn’t heard in the ten years since that memorable day. Please watch this and then come back and read the rest of this blog post: http://tinyurl.com/6cmfuwm .

“I believe (every)body has a little hero in ’em. You gotta look in. And if it’s in there, it’ll come out.” These are the words of one of the unsung heroes in New York City ten years ago. A hero captured in this Tom Hanks video. The question I ask myself today is, “What can I do to discover and act upon the hero within me?”

We can all do something. One of the valuable lessons pointed out in this video is how, at a time of intense tragedy, we helped one another. We set aside any differences, any prejudices, any ways that we, all too often these days, look to divide one another. We came together to become one. May one of the lessons of September 11, 2001 be that we should look at one another with those eyes on a daily basis, view one another as fellow citizens, and, thus, find the hero within us all.